Jump to content

Welcome to RR

Message of the day

If you don't do heroin, you're gay.

Join a club

Maybe even start your own. Just don't join the crazy cultist one. That one seems like one to avoid.

Click here to get started

Sign in to follow this  
Aimieee

webistes for watching tv series

Recommended Posts

Aimieee    10

I want to watch The latest episode of the walking dead but Kodi, Watch series and Putlocker arent working?? Any other suggestions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ArseRaptor    77
Just now, ragreynolds said:

Why pay when it's easy to watch for free

why watch a 144p free episode when you can pay next to nothing and watch unlimited for a month?

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ragreynolds    753
11 hours ago, n00gai said:

why watch a 144p free episode when you can pay next to nothing and watch unlimited for a month?

It's not hard to find free HD versions of shows online. And when you can't find HD, it's certainly not 144p. It's always watchable. The problem is that there isn't any one service that lets most people watch everything that they want to watch. I have a Netflix subscription, and I have access to an Amazon Prime Video account. But those two things do not cover everything I want to watch. By the time you end up adding up all the subscriptions you need, it is not longer just "next to nothing". It also isn't "next to nothing" I've you're on a budget, or if you don't have any spare cash.

8 hours ago, The_Right_Honourable_Jimmy said:

BBC iplayer.

Embrace your nationality by watching brilliant British drama while taking advantage of your tv licence at the same time.

Also

:rolleyes: 

7 hours ago, Cocoacody said:

crunchyroll

anime is trash

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, ragreynolds said:

It's not hard to find free HD versions of shows online. And when you can't find HD, it's certainly not 144p. It's always watchable. The problem is that there isn't any one service that lets most people watch everything that they want to watch. I have a Netflix subscription, and I have access to an Amazon Prime Video account. But those two things do not cover everything I want to watch. By the time you end up adding up all the subscriptions you need, it is not longer just "next to nothing". It also isn't "next to nothing" I've you're on a budget, or if you don't have any spare cash.

Resolution is not everything. A blu-ray for example is 40 Mbit/s,

netflix is 8 Mbit/s.

From what I gather some of those streaming sites are so heavily compressed with interframe compression that the video is unwatchable. I bet it's way under 1 Mbit/s.

_____

Here is a video on compression for all of you streaming peasants that don't care about quiality. 

 

Streaming is okay....but dodgy streaming is just unwatchable.

 

RESOLUTION IS NOT EVERYTHING

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SkyBlu    154

BBC iplayer, 4OD, Crunchyroll, projectfreetv, http://hentaihaven.org/

 

14 hours ago, n00gai said:

why watch a 144p free episode when you can pay next to nothing and watch unlimited for a month?

This doesn't make sense. I'd actually be impressed if you could find me a 144p free episode of a recent TV show. If you wanna meme, it's gotta have some truth to it.

Pay next to nothing? Due to annoying region restrictions and licenses not everyone can watch everything for "next to nothing". If I wanna watch The Simpson's I have to buy all of the DVDs/Blu Rays on Amazon OR stream it somewhere for free.

Why you ask? Cause' I'm not a US citizen who pays for cable, so I can't use The Simpson's World. Same with HBO/AMC/Hulu

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Americans always complain that they can't watch BBC shows and series. The reason they can't is because we pay TV licence to enjoy prestigious British drama. So it infuriates me that people my age don't even use BBC iplayer when there is so much quality drama on it.

Most of my favourite shows are from the BBC.

Luther, Line of Duty, The Replacement, House of Cards UK, Happy Valley, Sherlock... etcetera etcetera

Edited by The_Right_Honourable_Jimmy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bryanna    201
On 4/5/2017 at 10:57 AM, His_Majesty_Jimmy_I said:

Americans always complain that they can't watch BBC shows and series. The reason they can't is because we pay TV licence to enjoy prestigious British drama. So it infuriates me that people my age don't even use BBC iplayer when there is so much quality drama on it.

Most of my favourite shows are from the BBC.

Luther, Line of Duty, The Replacement, House of Cards UK, Happy Valley, Sherlock... etcetera etcetera

what american complains about that? we have bbc america 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oppi    31

I'd recommend avoiding torrents for TV shows unless you really know what your doing with being as anonymous as possible. I got two C&D emails for torrenting Game of Thrones seasons 1 & 2 just a few months ago.

http://megashare.at is okayish, don't really like their site layout though.

http://videopad.me is what I used to watch the rest of Game of Thrones, they have various movies and TV shows.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ragreynolds    753
1 hour ago, Oppi said:

I'd recommend avoiding torrents for TV shows unless you really know what your doing with being as anonymous as possible. I got two C&D emails for torrenting Game of Thrones seasons 1 & 2 just a few months ago.

I'm not entirely sure about how it is in the US, but a couple of years ago I learned quite a lot about this as I worked for Sky, which is one of the main internet service providers in the UK. You see, what happens with the the letters/emails you get is that the people sending them don't actually know who you are. They know that someone has downloaded their stuff illegally, but they don't know who, all they can see is an IP or whatever. In order to get your actual details, they have to contact your ISP... unfortunately for them, data protection laws prevent this from happening in the UK (I'm unsure how the US compares). From there, these companies will supply a letter or email to your ISP to essentially forward onto you, since they themselves don't actually know who you are. If you receive too many of these and your ISP gets a bad feeling from it all, they will drop your service, but that's all that will happen, and even then it's something that I've never actually heard of happening, and neither had my trainer when I worked at Sky. The ISP is not allowed to actually give away your identity to the company you've pirated from, and they have no interest in taking legal action against you themselves, so in the end nothing ever comes of it.

The only way for these companies to get your information and get around the protection clauses in your contract with your ISP and to get around data protection laws would be to actually take legal action. Thing is, it would be far too inconvenient for them to do this, especially when you consider the amount of people out there who are pirating things. It would cost them far too much time and money, and it essentially could end up resulting in nothing other than wasted time for them. The only people they will actually go after are people who are actively sharing the content, meaning the people who actually upload the torrents in the first place, but even then it's hard for them to do. The people who really need to be worried are the ones hosting the websites that the torrents are uploaded to, such as The Pirate Bay.

TL;DR: The emails and letters you get are more of just a scare tactic than anything. Nothing will ever come of them unless you're someone who's actually uploading and sharing pirated content. Downloading for personal use has almost 0 risk attached, and at absolute worst you will probably just end up having your contract with your ISP nullified. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oppi    31
19 minutes ago, ragreynolds said:

I'm not entirely sure about how it is in the US, but a couple of years ago I learned quite a lot about this as I worked for Sky, which is one of the main internet service providers in the UK. You see, what happens with the the letters/emails you get is that the people sending them don't actually know who you are. They know that someone has downloaded their stuff illegally, but they don't know who, all they can see is an IP or whatever. In order to get your actual details, they have to contact your ISP... unfortunately for them, data protection laws prevent this from happening in the UK (I'm unsure how the US compares). From there, these companies will supply a letter or email to your ISP to essentially forward onto you, since they themselves don't actually know who you are. If you receive too many of these and your ISP gets a bad feeling from it all, they will drop your service, but that's all that will happen, and even then it's something that I've never actually heard of happening, and neither had my trainer when I worked at Sky. The ISP is not allowed to actually give away your identity to the company you've pirated from, and they have no interest in taking legal action against you themselves, so in the end nothing ever comes of it.

The only way for these companies to get your information and get around the protection clauses in your contract with your ISP and to get around data protection laws would be to actually take legal action. Thing is, it would be far too inconvenient for them to do this, especially when you consider the amount of people out there who are pirating things. It would cost them far too much time and money, and it essentially could end up resulting in nothing other than wasted time for them. The only people they will actually go after are people who are actively sharing the content, meaning the people who actually upload the torrents in the first place, but even then it's hard for them to do. The people who really need to be worried are the ones hosting the websites that the torrents are uploaded to, such as The Pirate Bay.

TL;DR: The emails and letters you get are more of just a scare tactic than anything. Nothing will ever come of them unless you're someone who's actually uploading and sharing pirated content. Downloading for personal use has almost 0 risk attached, and at absolute worst you will probably just end up having your contract with your ISP nullified. 

Figured as much but as I don't have a VPN I stick to just streaming with TV shows, better safe than sorry. Also there aren't really other good options for ISPs where I am so don't wanna risk losing them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oppi    31

Also a nice tip, if you go to Google and search for a show/movie and see that results were removed for DMCA complaints, if you click on the DMCA complaints and read them they will contain the URLs. This is a particularly good way to know if a site is legit because taken down specifically for infringing copyright. A lot of those sites may be foreign though, so keep that in mind.

Edited by Oppi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×