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Started a mini series to try and help people along the way when it comes to voting and who to vote for in the UK general election.

First video is on Voting and how its okay (but not brilliant) if you don't want to vote: 

Spoiler

 

Second Video is about political factions at the god awful manifestos out there:

Spoiler

 

Third video is on adaptability and how it is just as important as the manifestos and personalities of the different parties:

Spoiler

 

 

Edited by Flying_Squirrel
Added third video link

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Sappho    216

watched the whole first video, but i don't live in the U.K. so I won't be voting

 

I'm not sure how I feel about people not voting, but I could understand if people view all options as less than ideal there's not a lot of motivation to get involved with politics.

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ragreynolds    793
5 hours ago, Sappho said:

I'm not sure how I feel about people not voting, but I could understand if people view all options as less than ideal there's not a lot of motivation to get involved with politics.

 

I think everyone should have to vote, and if you don't then you should be fined. That's probably the one thing Australia gets right. However, I think that on the ballot paper there should be an option to abstain. Doing this means that people who don't want to vote for any of the parties still don't have to, but it also means that everyone has to at least think about it and not ignore the fate of their countries political landscape.

As for the first video, I fall into the same area you had circled for yourself in the video, so I feel the same as you do. I don't like any of the parties although I dislike Theresa May less than I dislike Jeremy Corbyn. In this general election, I think the most important thing to be thinking about is Brexit and how that's going to turn out. I don't believe that Jeremy Corbyn will get us a good deal upon leaving the EU, and in fact, I wouldn't be surprised if he were to lead the charge to hold a second referendum which I am entirely against. Yes, we should have maybe had some terms set out before we put it to a vote, but it's too late for that now. People have voted for Brexit, so that is what must happen. You cannot have a second vote just because you don't like the result of the first one. We need to leave the EU, and although I'm not 100% confident that Theresa May will get us a fantastic deal, I think that she is sure as hell more likely to do better for us in negotiating Brexit than Jeremy Corbyn is. That fact alone makes me lean Conservative this election, as Brexit is certainly the most significant thing we are facing as a country.

As for the second video, you're absolutely right. No one should be expected to read the manifestos. I'd argue that authoritarian vs libertarian is more significant than left wing vs right wing.

Also, here's a neat little thing:

d1142af6f9804bf6a7d7f399f97e016d.png

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9 hours ago, ragreynolds said:

 

Also, here's a neat little thing:

d1142af6f9804bf6a7d7f399f97e016d.png

Wanting low taxes means you're more libertarian than authoritarian. Whoever did this graph did so with stupid American politics in mind. The Conservative party is more libertarian than Labour, The Greens and the liberal democrats combined. 

LABOUR IS THE MOST AUTHORITARIAN PARTY OUT THERE! 

They voted against article 50 even if the people voted. The lib Dems won't EVEN negotiate. 

Now that's what I call authoritarian. 

THAT GRAPH IS 

fakenews.jpg

 

Edited by His_Majesty_Jimmy_I

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ragreynolds    793
1 hour ago, His_Majesty_Jimmy_I said:

Wanting low taxes means you're more libertarian than authoritarian. Whoever did this graph did so with stupid American politics in mind. The Conservative party is more libertarian than Labour, The Greens and the liberal democrats combined. 

LABOUR IS THE MOST AUTHORITARIAN PARTY OUT THERE! 

They voted against article 50 even if the people voted. The lib Dems won't EVEN negotiate. 

Now that's what I call authoritarian. 

THAT GRAPH IS 

fakenews.jpg

 

Wanting low taxes isn't the only thing that makes a person libertarian. Libertarians are all about freedom and small government. The Conservative party is very much authoritarian, and if you thought otherwise then you have been grossly misinformed either of what the Conservatives stand for, or of what libertarianism actually is. The Conservatives are very much about controlling the people. This is obvious when you consider what happened a few years ago when certain sex acts were made illegal from porn filmed in the UK. Theresa May and the Conservative party are also looking to change the internet in a way to censor "hate speech". The Conservatives are against all forms of drug use, including marijuana. Libertarians are people who are all about people doing whatever they want so long as they are not harming anyone else. Libertarians are often pro-choice, for legalising pretty much all drugs, for legalising prostitution, for gay marriage, for lower taxes, and for small government. These are just a few examples of some of the most common libertarian standpoints. Labour is more libertarian than the Conservatives. Not by much, might I add, but they are most definitely more so.

Libertarian vs Authoritarian has absolutely nothing to do with American politics, and you need to stop screeching about that every time someone shows a graph you don't like or agree with. 

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1 hour ago, ragreynolds said:

Wanting low taxes isn't the only thing that makes a person libertarian. Libertarians are all about freedom and small government. The Conservative party is very much authoritarian, and if you thought otherwise then you have been grossly misinformed either of what the Conservatives stand for, or of what libertarianism actually is. The Conservatives are very much about controlling the people. This is obvious when you consider what happened a few years ago when certain sex acts were made illegal from porn filmed in the UK. Theresa May and the Conservative party are also looking to change the internet in a way to censor "hate speech". The Conservatives are against all forms of drug use, including marijuana. Libertarians are people who are all about people doing whatever they want so long as they are not harming anyone else. Libertarians are often pro-choice, for legalising pretty much all drugs, for legalising prostitution, for gay marriage, for lower taxes, and for small government. These are just a few examples of some of the most common libertarian standpoints. Labour is more libertarian than the Conservatives. Not by much, might I add, but they are most definitely more so.

Libertarian vs Authoritarian has absolutely nothing to do with American politics, and you need to stop screeching about that every time someone shows a graph you don't like or agree with. 

First I never claimed they are true libertarians as true libertarianism in Britain would mean we would have a completely political system all together but claiming they are more authoritarian than Labour is ridiculous. 

I'll give you most of the reasons why I believe they are more libertarian.

1) Privatisation of industries to improve how they work, instead of national services. (Small goverment) Labour wants everything national (AUTHORITARIAN) 

2) Lower Taxes.

3) I've watched various House of Commons debates while everyone indulged into what Trump said on twitter. Labour wanted to control how job centre employees conducted themselves through legislation while conservatives didn't. They wanted to come with more effective ways without having absolute laws for everything like Labour does.

Thatcher was the prime example of Britain's Libertarianism. Many tory MPs believe in Thatcherism.  Many conservatives want free markets, firm control over public expenditure, tax cuts, nationalism, privatisation and a dash of populism.

As libertarian as we can get in Britain without losing our British values.

That graph was made by a socialist, the same socialist that would argue that Hitler wasn't left wing. The type of socialist that calls the conservatives Nazis without realising that the Nazis were socialists.

 

Edited by His_Majesty_Jimmy_I

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ragreynolds    793
1 hour ago, His_Majesty_Jimmy_I said:

Something a wee bit more accurate that's a bit more international. I prefer this political compass more since the other one is so bad that it is a meme. 

politicalspectrum.jpg.c220f05da978840ffab3dc2b0fa58e31.jpg

The graph I posted was certainly not 100% accurate, but the one you've posted might just be even worse. Pretty much all of our political parties in the UK, INCLUDING the Conservatives, are Authoritarian. I am a right wing libertarian. You are making out that the Conservatives are that very same thing. If that were truly the case then I would agree with the Conservatives on much more than I do. The UK Conservative party is authoritarian. No, they are not 100% authoritarian, no party is, but they are still authoritarian. 

2 hours ago, His_Majesty_Jimmy_I said:

1) Privatisation of industries to improve how they work, instead of national services. (Small goverment) Labour wants everything national (AUTHORITARIAN) 

1

You pointed out one small difference between labour and conservative. Yes, on that specific issue, the conservative party is more libertarian. But when you take the issue of certain drug legalisation or just general human rights, labour is far more libertarian than the conservatives are.

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1 hour ago, ragreynolds said:

The graph I posted was certainly not 100% accurate, but the one you've posted might just be even worse. Pretty much all of our political parties in the UK, INCLUDING the Conservatives, are Authoritarian. I am a right wing libertarian. You are making out that the Conservatives are that very same thing. If that were truly the case then I would agree with the Conservatives on much more than I do. The UK Conservative party is authoritarian. No, they are not 100% authoritarian, no party is, but they are still authoritarian. 

You pointed out one small difference between labour and conservative. Yes, on that specific issue, the conservative party is more libertarian. But when you take the issue of certain drug legalisation or just general human rights, labour is far more libertarian than the conservatives are.

And I never said The Conservatives are 100% Libertarian however Thatcher was the corner stone of Libertarianism. According to that graph you posted they are portrayed as totalitarians.  Conservatives and Libertarians need to start praising Lady Thatcher instead of praising their "alt-right" anti-free speech Trump with his continuous fake news rhetoric that's become a meme now. 

If you hear anyone supporting Thatcherism, the Libertarian in you should start supporting them.

3980674-3x4-700x933.jpg

_______

In regards to your point on censoriship on the internet you must remember that censorship would probably be controlled by the websites that run that. A true libertarian would respect their right to censor stuff on their website (aka their property). I disagree with May's anti hate speech stance in regards to that of being a general shitlord. My Conservative MP believes in a tough skin ideology so he has my vote. I'm not going to risk Jeremy Corbin being in power because I disagree with a little internet thing. The only people that are really fussed about this are people who purposely want to be controversial shitlords. 

A vote will be put to parliament Ryan and parliament will vote, I bet the people who would vote against it would be mostly conservative. I bet you my life on it.

On drug legislation they are a bit behind but again, if we had a highly libertarian government then there wouldn't be any order. Most drugs should illegal and most courts do treat addicts like addicts if they don't commit any other crimes. I don't believe in radical libertarianism. I believe in libertarianism in regards to economics, property rights, privatisation of non-essential services and human rights. 

On regards to human rights....it was The Conservatives under David Cameron that brought a change to the party's view on gay marriage. Appealing the human rights act means that Parliament and our justice system can make a better human rights bill better fit for Britain instead of the Brussels. 

 

Edited by His_Majesty_Jimmy_I
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ragreynolds    793
7 hours ago, His_Majesty_Jimmy_I said:

And I never said The Conservatives are 100% Libertarian however Thatcher was the corner stone of Libertarianism. According to that graph you posted they are portrayed as totalitarians.  Conservatives and Libertarians need to start praising Lady Thatcher instead of praising their "alt-right" anti-free speech Trump with his continuous fake news rhetoric that's become a meme now. 

If you hear anyone supporting Thatcherism, the Libertarian in you should start supporting them.

3980674-3x4-700x933.jpg

_______

In regards to your point on censoriship on the internet you must remember that censorship would probably be controlled by the websites that run that. A true libertarian would respect their right to censor stuff on their website (aka their property). I disagree with May's anti hate speech stance in regards to that of being a general shitlord. My Conservative MP believes in a tough skin ideology so he has my vote. I'm not going to risk Jeremy Corbin being in power because I disagree with a little internet thing. The only people that are really fussed about this are people who purposely want to be controversial shitlords. 

A vote will be put to parliament Ryan and parliament will vote, I bet the people who would vote against it would be mostly conservative. I bet you my life on it.

On drug legislation they are a bit behind but again, if we had a highly libertarian government then there wouldn't be any order. Most drugs should illegal and most courts do treat addicts like addicts if they don't commit any other crimes. I don't believe in radical libertarianism. I believe in libertarianism in regards to economics, property rights, privatisation of non-essential services and human rights. 

On regards to human rights....it was The Conservatives under David Cameron that brought a change to the party's view on gay marriage. Appealing the human rights act means that Parliament and our justice system can make a better human rights bill better fit for Britain instead of the Brussels. 

 

Trump is not "alt-right" and he's not anti-free speech. Also, neither Libertarians nor most Conservatives praise Donald Trump. Libertarians don't like Trump for the most part, and neither do traditional Conservatives. Thatcherism was 'libertarian-lite'.

Yes, libertarians respect individual company rights to run things the way they please, but they would never respect the decision to censor anything. They would respect the fact that a company could choose to censor, but they would never respect the censorship itself. These companies that the Conservatives want to have censor information, are not doing it of their own free will. The Conservatives want to force them into removing certain types of messages, and if they don't do it then they will be fined. The Conservatives even suggesting this makes them the opposite of libertarians.

I would rather Theresa May than Jeremy Corbyn, I've already said that multiple times. I'm far more in-line with Conservatives than I am with Labour, but that doesn't change the fact that the Conservatives are not by any means libertarians. They just aren't. 

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11 minutes ago, ragreynolds said:

Trump is not "alt-right" and he's not anti-free speech. Also, neither Libertarians nor most Conservatives praise Donald Trump. Libertarians don't like Trump for the most part, and neither do traditional Conservatives. Thatcherism was 'libertarian-lite'.

Yes, libertarians respect individual company rights to run things the way they please, but they would never respect the decision to censor anything. They would respect the fact that a company could choose to censor, but they would never respect the censorship itself. These companies that the Conservatives want to have censor information, are not doing it of their own free will. The Conservatives want to force them into removing certain types of messages, and if they don't do it then they will be fined. The Conservatives even suggesting this makes them the opposite of libertarians.

I would rather Theresa May than Jeremy Corbyn, I've already said that multiple times. I'm far more in-line with Conservatives than I am with Labour, but that doesn't change the fact that the Conservatives are not by any means libertarians. They just aren't. 

First we just all the MPs and put them In a box. What I was trying to argue is that Labour is authoreterian than the conservative party. Now how far is debatable and where you compare the baseline from. I think we can argue about this for years but I'd rather not anymore. 

Let's agree to disagree.

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it is interesting watching you two 'debate'. From my point of view i agree with Ryan far more than you Jimmy, politically he is correct and you simply cannot accept that because of who you support, it is quite authoritarian of you to decide what Ryan should be calling what and what he should be using just because of where it was based and it is also quite authoritarian of you to tell him that his graph was created by a socialist, the ones that got Hitler into power, to prove a point that he shouldn't use it. Authoritarianism is about control and strict obedience and that was what you were trying to do to Ryan to prove your point, telling him what he should and shouldn't use, who he should be supporting. Interesting coming from a Tory. The Tories are far more authoritarian than labour in their approach always have been. I imagine it was tough for Ryan to debate with you, because like most tories, you have a habit of wanting something but not really caring for why people would disagree with you as long as you get what you want. Lets be real, youve decided to end the debate, you'll never think about what Ryan has to say on this ever again.

It is simple though. Who ever is in power gets to decide where the line is for all of this, we've had "centre" right govs in power for quite some time and therefore that centre is placed firmly on the right side, making anything that isn't what we're used to look oppressive, left leaning and extreme. You don't believe your party is authoritative, at least not to the extent of labour because your party has been able to decide where that line is. 

Also while we are here, while the Nazi party was originally a socialist party, it soon turned into a fascist, authoritarian, dictatorship, it was no longer socialist the moment Hitler took charge and was no longer socialist for quite some time before that. It is a point many people like to make that the Nazi's were actually lefties but that's not true, they were to begin with but by the time Nazi rule came around they were right wing which is something that has followed through to today. Heres the thing with that though, that line i was talking about for the Nazis being far right was placed there by our govs, Churchill was in power then, leader of the centre right tories, NOT a liberal man at all, he decided that on behalf of Britain. It's just the way the political climate is. It wasnt the left who decided this.

The Nazis are a perfect example of letting extremes go unchecked, the were an extreme left wing group whose initial goal was to get people away from communism, they became an extreme right ring group over the course of their existence. It doesnt mean that either sides are bad, it doesnt mean that socialism or authoritarianism is bad, it just means there are extremes that we cannot cross every again.

 

 

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The manifesto isn't that authoritarian on free speech if you ask me. Yes it might be the least libertarian thing on there but it's on a 'responsibility' basis. So it's still up to the website.

I don't see anything wrong with advising websites to be anti-bullying and anti-shitlord. Considering the normies are sensitive little shits that have break down over words, it's the ONLY solution. As long as it's up to the company and it's not law the whole bullying thing I'm alright. Now with the violence and the age-inappropriate content...I totally agree with May. 

If people don't like what a company considers hate speech, they simply don't have to use it. They can go on /pol/ since they lack the English etiquette of at least being slightly polite and having an ordinary argument without throwing personal discriminatory slurs all over the place. 

592d68f86ecad_ScreenShot2017-05-30at13_42_25.thumb.png.ed8991a62ff18f09b68899ecbae6d0fb.png

 

Edited by His_Majesty_Jimmy_I

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Quote

"Political Compass has tried to judge where the main UK parties sit. But we don't all see left and right, libertarian and authoritarian, in exactly the same way. All these sites say they are non-partisan, and many have extensive "FAQ" sections dealing with accusations of bias."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/election-2017-40057329

Another reason that graph is flawed in my opinion. UKIP. If anything they are more libertarian than the lot other than their recent burqa thing but by the time that graph came out I bet the new manifesto didn't.

I'm not a supporter of UKIP, I like to make that clear for the newbies. I think they are bunch of loonies.

Edited by His_Majesty_Jimmy_I

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ragreynolds    793
8 hours ago, Sappho said:

uk2015.png

1v1 me

That actually looks quite accurate, although I'd put labour on the left side under Jeremy Corbyn. 

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On 2017-5-29 at 0:34 PM, ragreynolds said:

As for the first video, I fall into the same area you had circled for yourself in the video, so I feel the same as you do. I don't like any of the parties although I dislike Theresa May less than I dislike Jeremy Corbyn. In this general election, I think the most important thing to be thinking about is Brexit and how that's going to turn out. I don't believe that Jeremy Corbyn will get us a good deal upon leaving the EU, and in fact, I wouldn't be surprised if he were to lead the charge to hold a second referendum which I am entirely against. Yes, we should have maybe had some terms set out before we put it to a vote, but it's too late for that now. People have voted for Brexit, so that is what must happen. You cannot have a second vote just because you don't like the result of the first one. We need to leave the EU, and although I'm not 100% confident that Theresa May will get us a fantastic deal, I think that she is sure as hell more likely to do better for us in negotiating Brexit than Jeremy Corbyn is. That fact alone makes me lean Conservative this election, as Brexit is certainly the most significant thing we are facing as a country.

It's interesting to see how we differ in who we think will give us the better deal in Brexit. I personally think Jeremy Corbyn will give us a better Brexit because of the fact he was pro staying in the EU. I believe in his manifesto that it's stated that they don't have an intention to double back on Brexit, which I would believe is a statement he will uphold. I say this because double backing on that would not only throw his party into the shit (which I imagine he's all too aware of) but it would also go against Socialist values of being a libertarian party. However, the fact he is pro EU suggests to me that he will be in favour of trying to get a deal which is as close to being in the EU without actually being in it. In recent times he's also shown a lot of persistence as well, particularly when it comes to requesting debates with May:

On the other hand, Theresa May doesn't come across to me as the kind of person to get us the best deal. She seems to back down quite quickly when met with strong opposition. I've seen a number of interviews with her where she constantly repeats phrases and makes vague statements when questioned about certain topics. One interview which comes to mind was a recent one in Plymouth (http://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/three-minutes-of-nothing-herald-reporter-reflects-on-pm-encounter/story-30363961-detail/story.html). There's also the fact she refuses to debate Jeremy Corbyn. Which for people like me who are undecided is something that would really help us along in deciding who to vote for. She points out in the video that she would prefer to address the audiences questions directly as it's more beneficial, but these are people (in the audience) who aren't 100% experienced in politics don't have the experience to point out flaws in manifestos and statements that they've made. However, if two polar opposites debate, you not only get to see the true personality behind those leading the parties, but also how well their policies stand up through criticism from the opposition (aka those that do politics for a living). Anyway, I find that she comes across as a somewhat fickle person from what I've seen and not somebody I'd trust with running the country, regardless of the fact she's right wing. She also has a history of unorthodox views which she has changed her mind on, for example same sex marriage and whether EU citizens in the UK could stay after Brexit, which begs the question as to whether there is anything else major regarding her views which might change in the future. 

 

Regarding the voting video, I agree with your points on making voting compulsory, with the option to not vote for a party.

Edited by Flying_Squirrel
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ragreynolds    793
9 hours ago, Flying_Squirrel said:

It's interesting to see how we differ in who we think will give us the better deal in Brexit. I personally think Jeremy Corbyn will give us a better Brexit because of the fact he was pro staying in the EU. I believe in his manifesto that it's stated that they don't have an intention to double back on Brexit, which I would believe is a statement he will uphold. I say this because double backing on that would not only throw his party into the shit (which I imagine he's all too aware of) but it would also go against Socialist values of being a libertarian party. However, the fact he is pro EU suggests to me that he will be in favour of trying to get a deal which is as close to being in the EU without actually being in it. In recent times he's also shown a lot of persistence as well, particularly when it comes to requesting debates with May:

On the other hand, Theresa May doesn't come across to me as the kind of person to get us the best deal. She seems to back down quite quickly when met with strong opposition. I've seen a number of interviews with her where she constantly repeats phrases and makes vague statements when questioned about certain topics. One interview which comes to mind was a recent one in Plymouth (http://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/three-minutes-of-nothing-herald-reporter-reflects-on-pm-encounter/story-30363961-detail/story.html). There's also the fact she refuses to debate Jeremy Corbyn. Which for people like me who are undecided is something that would really help us along in deciding who to vote for. She points out in the video that she would prefer to address the audiences questions directly as it's more beneficial, but these are people (in the audience) who aren't 100% experienced in politics don't have the experience to point out flaws in manifestos and statements that they've made. However, if two polar opposites debate, you not only get to see the true personality behind those leading the parties, but also how well their policies stand up through criticism from the opposition (aka those that do politics for a living). Anyway, I find that she comes across as a somewhat fickle person from what I've seen and not somebody I'd trust with running the country, regardless of the fact she's right wing. She also has a history of unorthodox views which she has changed her mind on, for example same sex marriage and whether EU citizens in the UK could stay after Brexit, which begs the question as to whether there is anything else major regarding her views which might change in the future. 

7

I honestly don't think either of them is suited to getting a good deal out of Brexit, I just think that Theresa May will get a slightly less bad deal. I do agree that Theresa May refusing to debate is a huge issue. I don't want a leader who refuses to debate with anyone. If someone challenges you to anything, the only thing you should ever say in response is "When and where?"

Corbyn, on the other hand, is a man who refuses to denounce the IRA. Note, I'm not referring to the video that was deliberately edited to show Corbyn saying "No" when asked to condemn the IRA, that video was misrepresenting him. But he has on many occasions refused to condemn them by dodging questions about them.

Quote

 

In an interview with BBC Radio Ulster, Mr Corbyn was repeatedly challenged to condemn the IRA's actions.

Mr Corbyn responded: "I condemn all bombing, it is not a good idea, it is terrible what happened."

Asked again if he condemned the IRA, Mr Corbyn responded: "Look I condemn what was done by the British Army as well as the other sides as well. What happened in Derry in 1972 [Bloody Sunday] was pretty devastating as well."

Asked a final time if he condemns the IRA, Mr Corbyn replied "I feel we will have to take this up later you know" before his phone cut out because of a bad signal.

 

Source.

Then he did a similar thing on that Question Time show the other day, only to then make some concerning remarks regarding defence and how he'd essentially just let another country nuke us first before moving onto retaliating.

Now, this is very important in my eyes because it shows he is not willing to take charge and be an aggressor. These are just two of many examples I could give of why I do not think that Jeremy Corbyn is or would be a strong leader. He comes across as a nice enough guy, but he also seems delusional to me, and also a bit of a pushover. I think that when he is challenged by the EU during Brexit negotiations he would back down since he was never really for leaving the EU in the first place (as you said). I do not think it's a good thing that he was against leaving the EU because as I just said, I think it means he will be more likely to get us a softer Brexit deal as opposed to a harder Brexit deal. Theresa May, on the other hand, was also against leaving the EU, but I think that she has proven herself in regards to Brexit and I think that she has shown that she has the ability to put her own personal opinions to the side and actually get on with completing the will of the people.

As I said, I really really do not like either of them. I am against almost everything that Corbyn stands for. May, on the other hand, I am not against entirely, but there are certain key issues that I feel very strongly about that make me despise her as a candidate. The most notable of these issues being the fact that she wants to create her own regulated Internet and crack down on hate speech.

I find myself stuck between voting for a man whom I'd never even dream of voting for, as I believe that socialism never works, and never has worked. I also just simply disagree with him on various key issues, and I don't think he is a strong enough character to lead our country. I'm stuck between voting for him, or a woman who wants to destroy a lot of what I love about the internet seems to have no integrity and supports various acts that I am strongly against.

I'm probably not going to vote. I refuse to vote for Corbyn, and although I was originally planning on voting Conservative, each passing day makes me less willing to vote for Theresa May. I don't like the liberal democrats either, so they aren't really an option for me either.

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The whole IRA thing only bothers me on the soul basis people insist on digging up the dirt on something that happened over 20 years ago. He's already said that the bombings, etc were a tragedy. But perhaps, while not in favour of the strategies used by the IRA, perhaps he was in favour of what they stood for, which was independence from the UK, which is probably why he refuses to condemn the IRA. He also probably doesn't see the point in apologising for something which happened 20 years ago. It's like asking the Duke of Northumberland if he's proud of the fact his relatives murdered and raped their way into Scotland (now Northumberland). No doubt he's proud of the overall outcome given his position of power, but probably (I'd like to think) a bit embarrassed about how he got there in the first place.   

That's one of the reasons I can see Donald Trump as a half decent person despite his shady history, because I don't care about something that happened decades ago, it doesn't define them as a person in the present... Although, by a sharp contrast I still hate the Duke of Northumberland. 

As for whether Corbyn a pushover, from what I've seen I would beg to differ. I believe the whole carry on with Labour having to reelect him as party leader is testament to that and his refusal to back down from what he thought was the right thing to do, despite the media bias against him and the turmoil within the part at the time. 

He's definitely somewhat unconventional in comparison to your stereotypical politician, so it is difficult to pin down exactly what type of personality he has, especially when the media is either ridiculously biased towards him or ridiculously against him. If anything, all this election has really shown is that you can't trust the media to do their job. Instead your left piecing together a jigsaw puzzle with pieces from different puzzle sets. 

I am in a similar position to you in the sense I still don't know who to vote for because there's not really anybody representing the right libertarian spectrum, both of the political charts depicted in this thread picture the exact problem. However, part of me is curious as to how Socialism would work in a first world country. I did a bit of research and the only other country that came remotely close to it was the USSR and at the time it wasn't even a first world country. And while in theory it seems to fall flat on it's face, I can't help but wonder is something important in the theory was missed out. It's a reckless way of thinking, but curiosity often gets the better of me when it comes to things like this. 

There's also the flexibility issue I brought up in my latest video, a lot of changes will happen to the economy in years to come, and we're going to need someone who can adapt to that. I don't really see an Authoritarian based party like the Conservatives delivering that degree of flexibility. 

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