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The_Right_Honourable_Jimmy

Prime Minister's Questions 19 July 2017

Who did better in this debate, the PM or the Opposition?  

2 members have voted

  1. 1. Who did better in this debate, the PM or the Opposition?

    • Prime Minister Theresa May (Conservative)
    • Leader of The Opposition Jeremy Corbin (Labour)
      0
    • No One/ Someone Else


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I am aware Parliament is in recess till the 5th of September however I wanted to populate this area of the club before new debates immerse.

'The Hansard Review' is a place where we discuss and review various parliament debates that take place within The Houses of Parliament in the UK and Canada.

https://hansard.parliament.uk

You may also post about Congressional debates from the US.

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If you can't find a video of that debate, post it through the Parliamentary Hansard or through Congressional Record. Put it in spoilers though or post the link.

Each debate should have its own thread.

_______________________

How did everyone perform?

Who did better in this debate, the PM or the Opposition?

___________________________

House of Commons Hansard with the verbal the exchanges between The Prime Minister Theresa May (CON) and The Leader of The Opposition Jeremy Corbyn (LAB) in writing. 

 

 

 

 
  • Q1.  If she will list her official engagements for Wednesday 19 July. [900571]

  •  

    As we approach recess, I am sure that Members from all parties wish to thank the staff of the House for their dedication to our work here in what has been a particularly challenging year. We saw terrorists attack our democracy and our way of life—not just in the Westminster attack, but in the attacks at Manchester, Finsbury Park and London Bridge. It is thanks to the professionalism and bravery of people such as Elizabeth Bryan, an off-duty A&E nurse from Cambridgeshire who ran to help at the scene of the Borough Market attack and who is with us in the Gallery today—[Hon. Members: “Hear, hear]—that these attacks will never succeed. We are united in defending the values that define our nation.

     

    This morning I had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others, and in addition to my duties in this House, I shall have further such meetings later today.

  • Of course the whole House associates itself with the Prime Minister’s words about defending our values. Her schedule does not seem so busy, so could she find time to visit Coventry? I can assure her of  a warm welcome from the city’s three Labour MPs, who all doubled their majorities in the recent general election that she called; we were very grateful for that.

    On a serious note, is the Prime Minister aware that Coventry is the designated national research and development centre for the controls of driverless vehicles? Would she not consider it an appropriate location to relocate her whole Government to? Then she could see the controls of driverless vehicles in practice.

  • Well, I am always happy to visit the west midlands. I am particularly pleased to visit the west midlands under its new Mayor, Andy Street, who is doing a very good job. The hon. Gentleman mentioned automated vehicles. This country is a leader in automated vehicles. That is part of building a strong economy and that is what this Government are doing.

  • Q4.  Our national health service was last week judged the best, safest and most affordable healthcare system—better than that of France, Germany, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, Australia and New Zealand. Too often in this House, we focus on the negatives. I have heard the Labour party attempt to weaponise the NHS. Will my right hon. Friend—and, I hope, the Leader of the Opposition when he stands—congratulate NHS staff on their skills and dedication, and on the hard work they have put in to achieve these high standards? [900574]

  • I am very happy to stand here and congratulate all NHS staff, who are delivering such a fantastic service and who have made the NHS, once again—this is not the first time—the No. 1 health system in the world. We are determined to continue to enable that high level of service to be provided, which is why we will be investing more than half a trillion pounds in our NHS between 2015 and 2020.

  • I join the Prime Minister in thanking all the staff of this House for all the work they do all the year round. They are fantastic, supportive and inclusive, and they are great with the public who come here. I want to thank them for everything they do.

    I also join the Prime Minister in thanking all our emergency services for the way they coped with all the terrible emergencies we have had over the past few months in this country, and I thank those communities, such as my own in Finsbury Park, that have come together to oppose those who try to divide us as a community and as a people. The emergency services were in action again yesterday, protecting the people of Coverack from the flood they suffered. We should always remember that we rely on those services.

    The Chancellor said this week that some public servants are “overpaid”. Given that the Prime Minister has had to administer a slapdown to her squabbling Cabinet, does she think the Chancellor was actually talking about her own Ministers?

  • First, I join the right hon. Gentleman not only in praising the work of our emergency services, but in recognising the way in which after the terrible terrorist attacks, and of course the appalling tragedy of the Grenfell Tower fire, we have seen communities come together and support those who have been victims of those terrible incidents. I was very pleased, as he knows, to be able to visit Finsbury Park after the attack there and see for myself the work that had been done in that community and the work that he had done that night in working among his constituents to ensure that the community came together after that terrible attack.

    On public sector pay, I simply say this to the right hon. Gentleman: I recognise, as I said when I stood on the steps of Downing Street a year ago, that some people in our country are just about managing—they find life a struggle. That covers people who are working in the public sector and some who are working in the private sector, which is why it is important that the Government are taking steps to, for example, help those on the lowest incomes through the national living wage. It is why we have taken millions of people out of paying income tax altogether; and it is why under this Government basic rate taxpayers have seen a tax cut of the equivalent of £1,000. But you only get that with a strong economy, and you only get that with a Conservative Government.

  • I thank the Prime Minister for what she said about my own community; I am obliged to her for that. However, my question was about whether the Chancellor had said that public service workers are overpaid or not. The reality in this country is simply this: a nurse on a median salary starts on £23,000; police officers start on £22,800; and jobcentre clerks start on £15,000. I had a letter from Sarah who wrote to me this week about her sister-in-law, who is a nurse. Sarah said:

    “she has sacrificed her health for the caring of others. She has had a pay freeze for the last five years. Only her dedication and passion for her vocation keeps her going. Why is this happening”.

    What does the Prime Minister say to Sarah and those others working in our NHS?

  • What I say to Sarah and to those working in the national health service is that we recognise the excellent work they are doing. We recognise the sacrifice that they and others have made over the past seven years. That sacrifice has been made because we had to deal with the biggest deficit in our peacetime history—left by a Labour Government. As we look at public sector pay, we balance being fair to public sector workers, protecting jobs and being fair to those who pay for them. The right hon. Gentleman seems to think it is possible to go around promising people more money and promising that nobody is ever going to have to pay for it. He and I both value public sector workers. We both value our public sector services. The difference is that on this side of the House we know that you have to pay for them.

  • The Prime Minister does not seem to have had any problem finding money to pay for the Democratic Unionist party’s support. The Conservatives have been in office for 84 months, and 52 of those months have seen a real fall in wages and income in our country. In the last Prime Minister’s Question Time before the general election, the Prime Minister said:

    “every vote for me is a vote for a strong economy with the benefits felt by everyone across the country.”—[Official Report, 26 April 2017; Vol. 624, c. 1104.]

    Does she agree you cannot have a strong economy when 6 million people are earning less than the living wage?

  • I will tell the right hon. Gentleman when you cannot have a strong economy: it is when you adopt Labour party policies of half a trillion pounds of extra borrowing, which will mean more spending, more borrowing, higher prices, higher taxes and fewer jobs. The Labour Government crashed the economy; the Conservative Government have come in—more people in work, more people in jobs, more investment.

  • May I invite the Prime Minister to take a check with reality on this? One in eight workers in the United Kingdom—that is 3.8 million people in work—are now living in poverty. Some 55% of people in poverty are in working households. The Prime Minister’s lack of touch with reality goes like this. Low pay in Britain is holding people back at a time of rising housing costs, rising food prices and rising transport costs; it threatens people’s living standards, and rising consumer debt and falling savings threaten our economic stability. Why does the Prime Minister not understand that low pay is a threat to an already weakening economy?

  • The best route out of poverty is through work, and what we now see is hundreds—[Interruption.] Yes, it is.

  • Order. The question has been asked. The Prime Minister’s answer must—and however long it takes, it will—be heard.

  • The best route out of poverty is through work. That is why it is so important that, over the last seven years, we have seen 3 million more jobs created in our economy. It is why we now see so many thousands of people in households with work, rather than in workless households, and hundreds of thousands more children being brought up in a household where there is work rather than a failure to have work. That is what is important. But what is important for Government as well is to ensure that we provide support to people. That is why we created the national living wage. That was the biggest pay increase ever for people on the lowest incomes. When did the Labour party ever introduce the national living wage? Never! That was a Conservative Government and a Conservative record.

  • It was Labour that first introduced the minimum wage—with opposition from the Conservative party.

    Wages are lower than they were 10 years ago. The Prime Minister has been in office for just one year, and during that time disposable income has fallen by 2%. The economic consequences of austerity are very clear, and so are the social consequences: life expectancy stalling for the first time in 100 years. Today, the Institute for Fiscal Studies forecasts that income inequality is going to get worse and that child poverty will rise to 5 million by 2022. Does the Prime Minister—[Interruption.]

  • Order. Members are shouting, and shouting excessively. They must calm themselves. Take some sort of soothing medicament.

  • I will try to help hon. Members, Mr Speaker. Does the Prime Minister not realise that her talk of a strong economy does not remotely match the reality that millions of people face, with low wages and poverty at home?

  • The right hon. Gentleman is, of course, wrong in some of the facts that he is putting forward. In fact, inequality is down. Life expectancy is continuing to rise. What we know is that what will not deliver a strong economy for this country is Labour’s policies of more borrowing, more spending, higher taxes and fewer jobs. What the right hon. Gentleman wants is a country that is living beyond its means. That means making future generations pay for his mistakes. That is Labour’s way, and the Conservatives will never do that.

  • What we want is a country where there are not 4 million children living in poverty and where homelessness does not rise every year. I look along the Front Bench opposite and I see a Cabinet bickering and backbiting while the economy gets weaker and people are pushed further into debt. [Interruption.] Well, they can try talking to each other. The economy is—[Interruption.]

  • Order. The hon. Member for Stratford-on-Avon (Nadhim Zahawi) is gesticulating in a distinctly eccentric manner and he must stop doing so. Shakespeare’s county deserves better.

  • The reality is that wages are falling, the economy is slowing, the construction sector is in recession, the trade deficit is widening, and we face crucial Brexit negotiations. Is not the truth that this divided Government are unable to give this country the leadership it so desperately needs now to deal with these issues?

  • I will tell the right hon. Gentleman the reality. The reality is that he is always talking Britain down and we are leading Britain forward. Let us look at the record of the Conservatives in government: 3 million more jobs, 4 million people out of paying income tax altogether, over 30 million with a cut in their income tax, record levels of people in employment, record numbers of women in work, the deficit cut by three quarters, inequality down, and record levels of foreign direct investment. That is a record to be proud of, and you only get it with a Conservative Government. [Hon. Members: “More!”]

  • I call Mike Wood. I do not think the hon. Gentleman knew how popular he was.

    .

    .

    _____________________________

 

Edited by The_Right_Honourable_Jimmy
posted wrong debate by accident

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ragreynolds    752

I don't think either came across particularly well. Problem is, Theresa May's government isn't doing a great job, so a lot of Corbyn's criticisms are very valid, however, Corbyn would be a million times worse, and the things that he believes should be implemented would destroy the economy entirely. I didn't watch the full thing, but from what I did watch it was just a bunch of "You did this" and "Well you did that". I didn't think it was very productive.

  • Upvote 1

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9 minutes ago, ragreynolds said:

"You did this" and "Well you did that". I didn't think it was very productive.

That's PMQ's for you but let's not blame the conservative backbenchers. I bet you'd like quite a lot of them. 

A lot of them always fight for,

Free trade

Free Markets

Globalisation 

Low Taxes

Less Regulation

Creating More Private Homes = Cheaper Homes

Getting rid of the welfare state

____

All of those things are a recipe for the type of society I want to live in. 

The government believes in those things but they are too preoccupied with cabinet civil wars and Foreign Relations to do anything about them.

Edited by The_Right_Honourable_Jimmy

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ragreynolds    752
15 minutes ago, The_Right_Honourable_Jimmy said:

That's PMQ's for you but let's not blame the conservative backbenchers. I bet you'd like quite a lot of them. 

A lot of them always fight for,

Free trade

Free Markets

Globalisation 

Low Taxes

Less Regulation

Creating More Private Homes = Cheaper Homes

Getting rid of the welfare state

____

All of those things are a recipe for the type of society I want to live in. 

The government believes in those things but they are too preoccupied with cabinet civil wars and Foreign Relations to do anything about them.

 

I don't want globalisation and I don't want the welfare state entirely eliminated, but the rest is great.

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1 hour ago, ragreynolds said:

I don't want globalisation and I don't want the welfare state entirely eliminated, but the rest is great.

Can't have globalisation and free trade. They come together.

Being for Globalisation doesn't mean you're a cuck like naive and stupid infowars fans say you would be.

Globalisation means that you could buy shit far cheaper and of a better quality, protectionists want to tariff trade where as libertarians want free trade.

If it means I can buy better and cheaper products and keep more of my income to spend on other things then globalisation is GREAT.

Anyone that tries to tariff trade to me is against freedom.

Libertarians are globalists.

It's the authoritarian alt-right that likes to call us cucks for wanting free trade instead of debate with us. 

Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher were globalists and they are the epitome of a society I want to live in.

The alt-right are acting like we want to destroy our countries when in fact we want to make sure we can keep more of our money and buy better products.

The alt-right acts the same way like the SJWs, calling libertarians cucks for wanting free trade.

Stoping globalisation means stopping free trade and that means being against liberty and capitalism.

Libertarian ReasonTV magazine on free trade and globalisation.

 

 

 

Edited by The_Right_Honourable_Jimmy

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ragreynolds    752
29 minutes ago, The_Right_Honourable_Jimmy said:

Can't have globalisation and free trade. They come together.

Being for Globalisation doesn't mean you're a cuck like naive and stupid infowars fans say you would be.

Globalisation means that you could buy shit far cheaper and of a better quality, protectionists want to tariff trade where as libertarians want free trade.

If it means I can buy better and cheaper products and keep more of my income to spend on other things then globalisation is GREAT.

Anyone that tries to tariff trade to me is against freedom.

Libertarians are globalists.

It's the authoritarian alt-right that likes to call us cucks for wanting free trade instead of debate with us. 

Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher were globalists and they are the epitome of a society I want to live in.

The alt-right are acting like we want to destroy our countries when in fact we want to make sure we can keep more of our money and buy better products.

The alt-right acts the same way like the SJWs, calling libertarians cucks for wanting free trade.

Stoping globalisation means stopping free trade and that means being against liberty and capitalism.

Libertarian ReasonTV magazine on free trade and globalisation.

 

 

 

Free trade is only a single part of globalism. I don't disagree with all of Globalism, I just reject most of it.

Globalism is about increasing the integration of world capital, with an end goal of essentially having a one world government. Globalists don't want borders, and that's not just for trade.

Nationalism is about retaining a countries own culture, it is about putting your own country first.

There are most certainly parts of globalism that are appealing to me, but I'm more in line with nationalism, not by a huge margin, but enough.

Not all libertarians are globalists, those are two different things. A quick Google search will have you find that there are just as many non-globalist Libertarians as there are pro-globalist libertarians.

Also, I don't know who exactly you're referring to when you talk about the 'Alt-Right'. The Alt-Right are a minute group of white nationalists, led by Richard Spencer. They have no power over anything, and almost no influence at all. The people I've seen call others cucks for being globalists are more trolly Trump supporters who are not actually alt-right. 

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